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The Latin Road to English Grammar - Complete Latin Curriculum for Home Schooling The Latin Road to English Grammar - Complete Latin Curriculum for Home Schooling
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Complete Homeschooling Courses in Phonics, Grammar, Spelling, Writing, and Latin
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Complete Homeschooling Courses in Phonics, Grammar, Spelling, Writing, and Latin
Complete Homeschooling Courses in Phonics, Grammar, Spelling, Writing, and Latin

Frequently Asked Questions

For what age is the study designed?

It is designed to begin as early as 5th grade. Most students using my curriculum are between 5th and 12th grades. It was my intention that students finish their Latin study before they entered high school so they could use the valuable skills in their high school subjects. So teaching the 3 Volumes in the 5th-8th grades is optimum. I have taught a few bright 4th-graders but it depends on the student and his willingness to work. Those already in high school who have a strong background in English grammar, being taught by a teacher or mom with a strong English grammar background, should be able to finish my curriculum in 2 years - Volume I in a semester, Volume II in a semester, and Volume III in one year. Most of my students who finished Latin by high school went on to the local junior college at 15 or 16 years old to take Spanish or French with professors fluent in those languages.

How long does each lesson take each day?

Each lesson averages about 50-60 minutes each day. This includes about 25-30 minutes of the teacher/parent guiding students through drilling, correcting, and explaining. Then all go apart to do about 25-30 minutes of written work.

Is this a Latin language study or an English grammar study?

This is first and foremost a Latin language study. When a student finishes all three years of study he is able to work through any Latin translations he desires - histories, the Latin Vulgate Bible, philosophies, etc. But because I do not assume the student knows English grammar, there is a full English grammar program built into it. In other words I make English grammar explanations before the related Latin explanations so that I can be sure a student can translate between Latin and English at any given time. Most high school Latin texts assume a student has a good understanding of English grammar when they begin Latin and do not show the relationships between the languages. These texts want you to memorize details of Latin and leave you or your Latin teacher to relate the languages. Both languages have some similarities but also some striking differences. I do not make you figure them out on your own.

Do we need to do another grammar study while studying Latin?

No, I found that we actually did more English grammar in the three years of Latin than most high school English curricula. In fact, Latin students have to pay better attention to many difficult English sentence structures to be able to translate between English and Latin and, therefore, learn the details of both languages well. You may find concepts and structures taught in a different order than an English text, but your students will have all the skills they need for college when they finish Volume III. Some “experts” discount my program as an English grammar study because I do not include a formal composition course in it. When my students became skilled at the language, teaching how to write essays, reports and research papers was easy. Students with skills in language and grammar are easy to guide through compositions.

How “mom-intensive” is this study?

This study has been designed for parents/teachers with no Latin background. I have not assumed you know the language, and so I have done all the preparation work for you. You do not have to decide how to teach each chapter, guess at pronunciation and translations, wonder if your answers are correct, make charts and vocabulary cards, make up quizzes and tests, etc. This has all been done for you - all you have to do is follow along and learn with your students. The lesson plans will tell you what to do in the textbook each day. You do all the work your students do so that you can direct them through the study and answer their questions. So your time commitment is the same as the student’s.

What Latin pronunciation do you use?

There are two traditions of Latin pronunciation, the “Classical” (Germanic) pronunciation and the “Church” (Italian) pronunciation. The only difference between them is how some letters are pronounced. And since Latin is not a conversational language this is a very minor point, definitely not worth the fight that some scholars engage in. I choose to use the “Church” (Italian) pronunciation because it is the closest to English and it is the only Latin you will hear spoken today. The only spoken Latin left in the world is in music and the liturgies of the Roman Catholic Church.

Why teach Latin? Isn’t it a dead language?

There is probably no other language in the world that affects English as much as Latin. We are over 60% Latin-based in our vocabulary and you will find that those words are often our more scholarly vocabulary; most of our common English words come from our German roots. So Latin makes the best choice for the foundations of a scholarly education. Also, Latin and English represent two different language structures: Latin is a highly inflected language, showing functions of words by adding endings to base words; English is non-inflected, showing functions of words by their placement within the sentence. By comparing and contrasting these two languages for three years through translating, a student will understand the basics of how most languages of the world work. This is why Latin students have the ability to pick up other languages so quickly. And it makes the best first foreign language to learn and teach. The fact that no one speaks Latin today is the reason some people consider it “dead”. And yet I consider that fact the biggest plus for teaching it. With Latin I did not have to be burdened with teaching conversation and could spend my time teaching the structure and vocabulary of the language. But Latin is very much alive in the “living” languages of Spanish, French, Italian, Romanian, and Portuguese. Students who finish Latin before high school are usually excited to tackle college Spanish or French because it is easy for them. And they will be taught by someone who is fluent in the language and can really converse with them.

How does your curriculum differ from other Latin programs?

There are quite a few Latin primers for younger children to begin playing with some of the components of Latin: words, roots, chanting. The LATIN Road to English Grammar encompasses the whole Latin language and leads to the skills of translation as well as structure and vocabulary. Comparing it with other high school Latin programs, you will find this is the easiest to follow and teach for someone who does not know Latin or doesn’t know how to teach it. My curriculum is designed in a multisensory style of teaching. In other words, it is a balanced combination of oral and written work. Students will hear, say, see, read, and write the language constantly. In this way all students can learn with their strengths and yet get to practice their weaknesses. If your student does not have neat handwriting or dislikes writing, then doing the Latin notebook will give him lots of practice to get better. If he does not listen or speak carefully, he will get a lot of practice in his oral drills. If his spelling is poor, Latin will provide a lot of clues to spelling far beyond that which he would get in a phonics program.

What credits do we get on our transcripts for this study?

I have been careful to give you the equivalent of 2 years of high school Latin in this 3-year study. High school students normally learn all the Latin structures and grammar along with a substantial vocabulary in the first two years. After that, any additional time spent in Latin classes is devoted to working through translations and adding to their vocabulary. Some schools and homeschool programs have also given English grammar credit to those who have completed Volume III.

Do you have any suggestions for younger students?

The PHONICS Road to Spelling and Reading.

This will be followed by The BRIDGE to the Latin Road, grammar and composition preparation for The LATIN Road to English Grammar (4th)

 
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